Fighting Corruption and Poverty by Criminal Justice System Reform

Fighting Corruption and Poverty by the Reform of Criminal Justice System

In a recent letter to Pamusa, President Barack Obama pointed out how government and private charity can cost-effectively address poverty relying on fairness and efficiency to correct its causes and other systemic challenges widening opportunity gaps. The most consequential passage in his letter reads, “By channeling resources into early childhood education and issuing discipline guidance to our schools, we are creating pathways to success instead of pipelines to prison, and through initiatives like My Brother’s Keeper, we are taking steps to ensure that all young people can reach their full potential.”

Admittedly, though, the channeling of resources into early education onward is in itself a problem because the least guarded official development assistance (ODA) and international charity are lost due to inefficient delivery systems or stolen by corrupt officials and bureaucrats along the way. What reaches the beneficiaries is either too late, inadequate, or anachronistic.

After nine years of operation Pamusa decided to pivot from the traditional nonprofit mission of just channeling resources to livelihood, healthcare, and educational projects. We now plan to be service providers and enhance the reform of the criminal justice system and law enforcement agencies (CJS&LEAs) by seeking donations from large-resource based nonprofits’ tax-deductible charity and the additional tax-exempt contributions they access in cooperative agreements to “bridge” funding gaps that occur when government budget falls short to finish investigation, prosecution, and other criminal proceedings against those accused of corruption and related financial crimes such as money laundering, fraud, conspiracy, racketeering, etc. oftentimes resulting in the guilty walking due to a number of reasons especially an imbalance of resources between the prosecution and the defense in favor of the latter.

The rule of law should prevail and the guilty punished. Thus, the eradication of corruption is only a matter of time. When that time comes only the criminally inclined will get involved in it and reducing government losses to corruption and the diversion of resources by the politically powerful for their pet projects engendering corrupt practices, which the President said, will finally go into early childhood education and issuing discipline guidance to our schools and create pathways to success instead of pipelines to prison, and through initiatives like My Brother’s Keeper, by which to ensure that all young people can reach their full potential.

Although achieved by a small city-state, the late Prime Minister Lee Kwan Yew made Singapore a model of a Third World nation lifting off the gravitational pull of corruption and poverty. This has made the difference for emerging market economies of other Asian countries like South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, perhaps Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam not necessarily in this order.